r/MapPorn Jun 14 '21

The Topography of Turkey

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11k Upvotes

681

u/bighurtbuehrle Jun 14 '21

Seems hilly

357

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

Especially eastern Anatolia is quite hilly. Ağrı mountain in that region is 5,137 m high.

190

u/Soitsgonnabeforever Jun 14 '21

Awesome mountains create great rivers to civilization

145

u/-4-a- Jun 14 '21

It's also a pain in the ass to build infrastructure on and part of why Inner Anatolia is so politically separated from the much flatter Western Anatolia.

0

u/Soitsgonnabeforever Jun 14 '21

Isn’t that why most civilization and progress was in iraq rather than turkish kurdistan

18

u/-4-a- Jun 14 '21

What do you mean civilization? If you mean human development, that's likely part of why.

11

u/Sgt-Sucuk Jun 14 '21

If your talking about the last decades. It was because there was alot of terror in turkeys kurd regions. Nobody wanted to invest and alot of people went to bigger cities like istanbul

43

u/Soitsgonnabeforever Jun 14 '21

I was talking about 10000 bc to 1900 ad. Estimated time of iraq/Syria golden period. Or whatever period that is better than now

21

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

I think it is not preferred due to climate and natural conditions. Even in these years, it can be seen at -20°C during the winter months. They may not have come here because it negatively affects agriculture and settlement. The climate of Iraq and Syria is very different due to the difference in altitude.

-6

u/burakt90 Jun 14 '21

The Kurdish ethnicity starts at about 2500 BC. I am pretty sure Kurdish people were very much a civilization until the Ottoman Empire started declining.

In WW1, the Brits suggested a Kurdish province but after the Turkish War independence and the Lausanne Treaty, Brits ran away. First decades of the Republic had plans to relocate Kurds to separate regions to prevent any uprisings.

So instead of a concentrated civilization in the East they are spread out across the country. Which is why the average person doesn’t have Turk/Kurd complex.

8

u/-4-a- Jun 14 '21

The Kurdish ethnicity starts at about 2500 BC.

What the hell is that supposed to mean

10

u/burakt90 Jun 14 '21

Well the person above said 10000 bc - 1900 ad. There was no Kurdish ethnicity distinction before 2500 bc. Its literally recorded history, what does downvoting accomplish? If you can disprove me I would love to learn something new.

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68

u/Dusan-Lazar Jun 14 '21

that region is 5,137 m high

just like me on a friday and saturday night 😲

32

u/Starkregen Jun 14 '21

(☞゚ヮ゚)☞

-9

u/Kulunja Jun 14 '21

That’s the Armenian Highlands. Anatolia is merely the part of Turkey that makes up the peninsula on the Asian side

14

u/ParevArev Jun 14 '21

Don't know why you're being downvoted. You're talking straight facts about geography. This is essentially Anatolia's boundaries

8

u/Kulunja Jun 14 '21

Thank you! Anatolia is geographic region, why would a geographic region have the exact boundaries of a national state with diverse topography? The Armenian Highlands and Anatolia have for centuries been considered different regions

3

u/Im_the_Moon44 Jun 14 '21

Because don’t forget Turkish nationalists prowl this sub

1

u/MundaneYoghurt Jun 14 '21

Any reason why the northern part of Anatolia stretches more to the east?

2

u/ParevArev Jun 14 '21

Well, that bit is still surrounded by water.

2

u/MundaneYoghurt Jun 14 '21

I don't understand.

3

u/ParevArev Jun 14 '21

Peninsulas are surrounded by water on 3 sides. The northern side that stretches further east is still bordering the Black Sea

2

u/MundaneYoghurt Jun 14 '21

Oooh right, I see it now lol

-23

u/[deleted] Jun 14 '21 edited Jun 14 '21

[removed]

14

u/A_ahc Jun 14 '21

Regions can have different names by cultures, ethnicities, even religions. Muslims name it from Al-Kuds, Jews and Christians name it from Yry-Shalem. It doesn't make any of them superior or wrong. Both are true. Same applies for Eastern Anatolian Mountains/Armenian Highlands

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13

u/Starkregen Jun 14 '21

Text book example of ill faith commenting and baiting to stir ultranationalist toxicity

Report this guy to Reddit admins make the site a better place.

2

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

Baiting? Almost my whole family got killed by the same guys who invented that artificial name. I won’t stand for it being used.

5

u/MaslakMafia Jun 14 '21

And my grandparents' parents and their whole village was slaughtered by your "always so innocent" people. I am not buying your "victim literature"

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9

u/Starkregen Jun 14 '21

Aha

3

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

“Aha”?

Whatever.

11

u/Starkregen Jun 14 '21

It means I’m not buying your bullshit. Your account is full of law effort baiting and trolling. Go play somewhere else

3

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

No, my account is not full of those things.

Go be a troll somewhere else.

23

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

No. Its Eastern Anatolia. Ağrı Mountain is part of Turkish Republic and Anatolia is Asian side of Turkey. Eastern Anatolia is where Ağrı mountain located.

4

u/Ballsofme Jun 14 '21

Historically and geographically speaking eastern and south eastern "anatolia" is not part of anatolian peninsula.

-19

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

One more thing. The mountain is called Ararat in English. Even if your ancestors tried to change the name in Turkish language after they committed a genocide on Greeks, Armenians and Assyrians.

9

u/MaslakMafia Jun 14 '21

It is called Hittitia. Even if your Greek, Armenian and Assyrian ancestors genocided them, the fact won't change.

Cheers to Europe or Western Ottoman Lands or Northern Roman Lands (historical)

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-11

u/[deleted] Jun 14 '21 edited Jun 14 '21

[removed]

10

u/Sgt-Sucuk Jun 14 '21

There is eastern northern sothern western anatolia end of discussion

-3

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

No, it’s not. You can’t “end” a discussion you didn’t win.

It’s Armenian Highland - known with that name in the whole world since the recorded history of the region started. Your genocidal rulers won’t change it, regardless of much they try.

6

u/Sgt-Sucuk Jun 14 '21

you cant end a discussiom you didnt win

I did

Your genocidal rulers won’t change it, regardless of much they try.

They did and now its called like that officially even in a german atlas from 1986 it was called anatolia

Cope

0

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

You didn’t, and in German it’s still Ararat and Armenian Highland. Anatolia is a bit to the west. It’s same in every single other language in the world.

Aside from Turkish of course, but well.

Cope yourself. Or maybe get educated instead.

4

u/Sgt-Sucuk Jun 14 '21

Ararat is just ağri translated, cool i guess lol

Anatolia is the whole caucasus up to the greek islands but turkey friendly country and gave it to armenia🤏🤮 and grease🏳️‍🌈🤢

Cope harder ermeni 💅💅

5

u/Wowiamnouse Jun 14 '21

you sound so butthurt about a region

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7

u/Molerus Jun 14 '21

Just wanted to say that this thread caused me to do some reading on the topic, and you're not wrong. From Wikipedia:
'Following the Armenian genocide, Western Armenia was renamed as the Eastern Anatolia Region by the newly established Turkish government. Vazken Davidian terms the expanded use of "Anatolia" to apply to territory formerly referred to as Armenia an "ahistorical imposition", and notes that a growing body of literature is uncomfortable with referring to the Ottoman East as "Eastern Anatolia".'

12

u/shifaci Jun 14 '21

Imagine quoting wikipedia about something related to Turkey and Armenians. Wikipedia is not reliable about conteoversial subects. Its editors are just random nobodies.

3

u/zulufdokulmusyuze Jun 15 '21

The Wikipedia article on Armenian-Turkish issues glorifies the assassination of Turkish diplomats and talks about the Armenian terrorists as heroes.

It is not just unreliable, it is sick.

1

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

Imagine thinking that Turkish history or geography books are a better source than Wikipedia.

8

u/MaslakMafia Jun 14 '21

Imagine not being a univesity graduate. Didn't your professors ever tell you not to cite wikipedia? Such a paper will get an F mark everywhere.

Wikipedia is useful to reach REAL sources like britannica, but wikipedia itself is not a reliable source.

And yes I am a Turk. God of enlightenment is on my side.

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u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

Thank you very much for researching this :)

-6

u/[deleted] Jun 14 '21

[deleted]

7

u/oppsaredots Jun 14 '21

Sorry, but this is the one stupidest reasoning I've ever seen regarding ANY historical information. Check the edit history on Wikipedia pages regarding the Turks on any matter. Turks are heavily brigaded in some of the social media platforms, as well as information sites. Wikipedia is one of them.

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-2

u/KitSpell Jun 14 '21

Armenians are not natives of that region. Fourth or fifth place in order. Must put an end to your are fantasies.

6

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

Yes, we are. Hence, it’s called Armenians highland. It’s not something you can dispute, it’s a not contested information. Armenians are native to Armenian Highland. The name came after us, and it has been named that way since antiquity.

-3

u/KitSpell Jun 14 '21

Hell nooo. What a ignorance...

Learn history kid.

5

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

You learn it. And not from fairy tales in Turkish history books.

It’s has been named Armenian Highland since antiquity - and it’s still named that way in every country in the world, except - guess what - Turkey.

0

u/KitSpell Jun 14 '21

You don't need to learn Turkish from history books. If you read the history book of any country, you will learn. Just don't read the history books of Armenia.

I communicate with people who think they are indigenous people in that area. Lol.

Do you believe the earth is flat?

3

u/Full_Friendship_8769 Jun 14 '21

No, but I believe that you don’t know jack shit about history, and you wrongly think that Armenia has falsified books instead of you. Yet somehow, the whole world agrees with Armenia and laughs at Turkish fairy tales.

Here, have some actual sources on that. Like this geography book from Ancient Greece .

4

u/KitSpell Jun 14 '21

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHCiP911KUI

These are from known history. Traces of many cultures from unknown history were found in that region. It's hard to deal with brainwashed people.

Never mind. Keep dreaming.

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u/Nunuxx Jun 14 '21

Surely you mean Mount Ararat?

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10

u/Dabeans07 Jun 14 '21

Hillypollas

3

u/stephenmdangelo Jun 14 '21

“So then you’ll walk down the hill and we’ll pick you up.”

387

u/original_name_45 Jun 14 '21

Interesting fact. The 2 largest lakes of Turkey, Lake Van (in the east) and Lake Tuz (on the central plateau) are both salt lakes with endorheic basins because they are completely isolated from the sea by the high surrounding mountain ranges.

214

u/Servb0t Jun 14 '21

Tuz is salt in Turkish

141

u/original_name_45 Jun 14 '21

Yeah, I felt weird writing Lake Tuz, but Salt Lake seemed very generic.

128

u/givingyoumoore Jun 14 '21

Don't tell Utah

49

u/MontagoDK Jun 14 '21

Utah means salt too ?

69

u/arjanhier Jun 14 '21

Salt Lake City!

38

u/SovietBozo Jun 14 '21

City means salt too?

14

u/xXSelf-ImmolateXx Jun 14 '21

In this case yes!

7

u/rosscmpbll Jun 14 '21

Salt salt salt!

6

u/Oxygen0796 Jun 14 '21

"Salt Lake Salt". What a weird name.

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u/Servb0t Jun 14 '21 edited Jun 14 '21

For sure, just thought it'd be a fun fact for people unfamiliar with Turkish

2

u/grahamcottam Jun 14 '21

Yes, but Turkish names dont always make sense in turkish e.g. : Ağrı dağı (Mount Ararat) is named Pain Mountain for some reason

3

u/[deleted] Jun 14 '21

Lake Van is not a salt lake. It is an Alkaline Lake.

3

u/original_name_45 Jun 14 '21

It's both actually, a saline alkaline (or soda) lake. Salt level is around 20-25 g/kg, not very high but saline. The alkalinity comes from sodium carbonate salts, wich is washing soda. Swimming in the lake also feels like swimming in soapy water.

2

u/[deleted] Jun 14 '21

Yes you are right. Fun fact, swimming in Lake Van can bleach your hair and skin and is known to temporarily turn people blonde.

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u/massproducerofwords Jun 14 '21

What's that flattish area near the centre of Turkey? Any well-known cities there?

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u/zamazingo Jun 14 '21

It is the Konya plain, lots of agricultural area there. Main city is also called Konya.

10

u/usmanaga9 Jun 14 '21

konya's agriculture is died

9

u/yukon-flower Jun 14 '21

What do you mean?

56

u/Ecaspian Jun 14 '21

what he means is that through years of ignorance, lack of support and harmful policies of the government caused the agriculture in the region to deteriorate to the point of death.

17

u/usmanaga9 Jun 14 '21

Konya have massive drought. It is predicted that in 100 years there will be a desert

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u/gkayaalp Jun 14 '21

Also Ankara, the capital, and Eskişehir, a beautiful little university town, and the homonymous provinces are roughly there.

26

u/akfgndz Jun 14 '21

It is the Konya plain, the city has the same name.

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u/gkayaalp Jun 14 '21

my comment from yesterday's rome thread:

The centre is about 1000m elevation. In Ankara, winters can go down to -20C and summers 40C, tho humidity is very low in central regions so it doesn't feel that bad in either extremes. In Erzurum and Kars and the rest of the farther east, it can hit the ballpark of -40C regularly, and summers are generally in the 20C region. Most of the black sea coastline is pretty rainy all the time, esp. the east, tho they are between mountain ranges and the sea so it's way warmer. The touristy regions of Aegean and Mediterranean coasts are again downhill from huge mountain ranges, so they are very hot and extremely humid. Marmara sea region, where Istanbul is, is hilly, but overall way lower than the rest of the country.

If you want to enjoy the sights of the plains, the steppes and the mountains, take the intercity trains. They make for very beautiful experiences.

This is ofc an exaggerated map, we've a lot of plateaus on high altitudes. The entire province of Konya is basically a goliardic tray at 1km altitude, for example.

22

u/batery99 Jun 14 '21

Black Sea coast has a similar climate to Western Europe and in some parts also Eastern US (Oceanic + Subtropical).

The touristic areas of Turkey can be as rainy as Black Sea, but it only rains outside summer. I was in Bodrum when a storm hit us in September and it was just crazy how strong the rain was. I also went to Antakya in winter, which is basically at the border on Syria and suprised how wet and cool the region was.

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u/mrtn17 Jun 14 '21

I just realise that the Black Sea looks a bit like Australia. Completely not interesting, but I wanted to share it anyway

8

u/Charlatanism Jun 14 '21

Looks like Cape York Peninsula snapped off, and Tasmania floated over to Perth.

49

u/El_Scorcher Jun 14 '21

As a truck driver, I hate it already.

20

u/ArmedBull Jun 14 '21

We need Turko Truck Simulator

6

u/OutlandishnessSea884 Jun 14 '21

Pretty sure ETS has a black sea dlc

4

u/sertack Jun 14 '21

My family lives in eastern Turkey and I travel 1500km east to west every summer since I studied in Izmir and it's really nice to travel between mountains.

35

u/Vayrox_Ayp Jun 14 '21

Turkey is like the archnemesis of the Netherlands

20

u/huopak Jun 14 '21

What's the software used for these?

13

u/chillerll Jun 14 '21

I don't know what he uses but you can use Blender for this.

147

u/T41EF Jun 14 '21

I've had the privilege of flying over Turkey many times. The views are stunning

122

u/joshikus Jun 14 '21

Someday, you should land in Turkey! Beautiful country, amazing people, and the food!

86

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

You should definitely try our food.

43

u/iamapersonmf Jun 14 '21

Good lahmacun is fucking awesome

41

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

All the southeast Anatolian food is awesome. Lahmacun, Baklava, Kebap, Cigköfte...

19

u/gkayaalp Jun 14 '21

good lahmacun is definitely good, but nothing comes close to the "patlıcan kebap", kebab with aubergines and nice flat meat patties. source: me, guy from Urfa. it sucks when they dry the aubergine out but if you can find it made nice, it's sooo god. my late grandma would do it every now and then, such a delight.

7

u/Barobarko Jun 14 '21

If you don't like patlıcan you are one sorry motherfucker. This guy gets it.

17

u/crzyphysicistinmakin Jun 14 '21

One reason why I love that the culture of turkey is so big in my home country Germany. I can get really really good authentic Turkish food nearly everywhere.

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u/T41EF Jun 14 '21

Road trip booked for next year. From Samsun to Antalya following the west coast. Can't wait

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u/pierreletruc Jun 14 '21

Go to Amasya it use to be the padisha kindergarden then Hattusha the hittite capital (contemporaneous to Pharoah) and Ankara medenyet muséum where you can see the sculptures from hattusha and other places.Dont miss kappadokkia but the west coast is nice with Gallipoli and Troy's ruin.then Dalaman turtles and antalya s Thermessosand phaselis (sky amphitheater and seaside antic ruin where you can swim).Enjoy!

4

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

Great! <3

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u/AbaddonsLegion Jun 14 '21

It gives me far more appreciation for all the ancient armies that traversed and fought on that terrain. As a U.S. Army Infantry veteran, I wouldn't want to hump that.

2

u/Justegarde Jun 16 '21

Working on a game design about medieval warfare in Anatolia and yes, completely agree. Armies have been fighting in that terrain for millennia, crazy

36

u/usual_irene Jun 14 '21

I remember reading somewhere about how the caucasus was like the buffer region between the Byzantines and the Persians.

43

u/Tarwins-Gap Jun 14 '21

It was literally a battleground between the Romans and whoever controlled Persia for a thousand years. Constantly shifting sides. It only ended after the battle of mazikert and the domination of Anatolia by the Turks.

25

u/asnaf745 Jun 14 '21

Oh dont worry after that it turned into turks vs persians until russia got involved

21

u/Olgun5 Jun 14 '21

turks vs persians

Turks vs turks you mean. Persia/Iran was pretty much under Turkic rule until very recently and their armies were mostly Turkic too

4

u/Radanle Jun 14 '21

It's strange how this type of revisionism is constant. Safavid dynasty for instance was not a turkish dynasty or empire. The first Safavid Shah Ismail had a multiethnic background. The very name is due to his paternal heritage of the kurdish islamic Safavid order. He was also great grandson to King Alexander I of Georgia. Only his maternal grandfather was Türkmen and then he also had mixed heritage.

The empire is Persian though. Just as Sweden didn't become French after the Bernadottes were crowned (they called themselves king of Sweden) so the Persian empire didn't become kurdish, Georgian or Turkish when another one took the title Shah (they always called themselves shah of Iran).

There have been Turks who took rule over the Persian empire like Alexander the great did for a short while. But the empire gradually evolved on the basis of the past. None of the dynasties (except the first Muslim ones, which were not Turkish) brought about any substantial change that would make it not a Persian empire and the people and the empire kept it's customs and particulars.

There is much to show this reality. For instance no matter which language a ruling dynasty first spoke in Persia it eventually got dropped for Persian. (The ottomans instead spoke ottoman which was mostly persian and Arabic.)

6

u/zulufdokulmusyuze Jun 14 '21

It is not revisionism, it is just that ethnic identities did not matter at the time, they became relevant only after the rise of nationalism in the 19th century.

So there will be multiple ways of mapping historical identities to today's identities, and the preferences will be mostly influenced by today's political concerns. I think the Turkish-Iranian border is so settled that what you call the Turco-Persian dynasties does not politically matter today.

I just find it fascinating that, as a native Turkish speaker, I can understand Shah Ismail (Hatayi as a poet)'s poems very clearly but I cannot understand Ottoman Sultans' poetry at all.

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u/MaslakMafia Jun 14 '21

Turks had the habit to adopt the culture of the places they conquered. And, yes they used Persian and Arabic as languages. If you read Turkish history you will realize that they were greatly influenced by Persians, and they adopted a large chunk of Persian culture. All islamic terms in Turkish are derived from Persian, not Arabic.

However, in order to determine a Turkish empire, look at the language the army speaks. If it is Turkish, then they are Turks. Safavids, Mughals, Mamlukes, all same.

And 2nd Ottoman Sultan Orhan married a Byzantine princess and continued bloodline with that. That doesn't make Ottoman Empire a Greek or Latin empire though.

And as I said before, Turkish empires are all like that, they adopt the local culture. So looking at the local culture and claiming Safavid empire is a persian empire is highly deceiving.

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u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

There are many questions about the maker of the map. -Source: https://www.usgs.gov/

(upvote this comment so everyone can see it)

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u/drumskirun Jun 14 '21

I'm sorry, but just linking to their homepage is neither helpful nor does it prove they created this.

5

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

They are selling digital copies of this map on istock. I couldn't find the original one and don't want to share istock link. Thats why i linked their homepage. If someone interested in their work, they can look their other works on their homepage.

9

u/glauberlima Jun 14 '21

I don’t know why but this picture reminds me of GoT opening. I even can hear the sound!

29

u/paleb1uedot Jun 14 '21

There's a huge misconception among westerners who never visited Asia Minor that it's a desert. Thanks to the mountains it's not.

8

u/World-Tight Jun 14 '21

That's some nice topography, that is.

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u/WWRyder Jun 14 '21

Dağ-amn that’s a lot of mountains

8

u/Ecaspian Jun 14 '21

ba-dum-tsssh

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '21

[deleted]

51

u/SkyDefender Jun 14 '21

Yep, you can’t blitzkrieg

14

u/RapidWaffle Jun 14 '21

Most of the heavy German tanks broke down with a mild hill, now imagine with huge valleys and mountains

3

u/Rosehiping Jun 16 '21

Even we can't bring modern tanks into Eastern Turkey, can't even imagine 1940's model tanks.

4

u/Coly1111 Jun 14 '21

Boy do I love topographical maps. They are just so neat.

7

u/MontagoDK Jun 14 '21

If only Google maps looked this pretty !!

5

u/shader301202 Jun 14 '21

more jpeg pls

26

u/Al-Azraq Jun 14 '21

Just noticed that the Black Sea looks like Australia.

12

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

I had never noticed this. An amazing detail

10

u/zzellers Jun 14 '21

Turkey makes a brand new Turkey

4

u/snzimash Jun 14 '21

Do Nepal

5

u/Just-Xav-Official Jun 14 '21

Turkey makes a brand new Turkey

3

u/ijuset Jun 14 '21

Arabian platform stahp please, we are stuck here. Cant move any furher.

Arabian platform: No

4

u/--Brian Jun 14 '21

I've always liked to peruse maps and find unique geographic features of different regions and somehow I never realized that Turkey is essentially all mountains. A serious TIL from this map. Thanks OP.

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u/LMessi101 Jun 14 '21

Turkey is exceptionally mountainous. I usually dread flying over any of it as turbulence is rife. Also suffers from a lot of earthquakes

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u/somenamestaken Jun 14 '21

Yeah, ask the Aussies about it.

4

u/flataleks Jun 14 '21

Beautiful

21

u/Dusan-Lazar Jun 14 '21

Anatolia and surroundings would nail it better

8

u/manwhocanttake Jun 14 '21

Because of the elevation we have harsh winters

3

u/starsOnTouch Jun 14 '21

How do you make these maps?

3

u/jackd1225 Jun 14 '21

Its like a massive wall / barrier between Europe and the Middle East, no wonder there's always so much tension.

2

u/dalhousieDream Jun 14 '21

Smoothest water

2

u/frankenwolf2022 Jun 14 '21

A well-done defrosted steak.

2

u/los_evangelos Jun 14 '21

So many mountains wow

2

u/CrackBaby1303 Jun 14 '21

Very tall country

2

u/amarillo2019 Jun 14 '21

How come a group of horse archers managed to dominate mountainous terrain?

5

u/flataleks Jun 14 '21

The same way as heavy armored romans.

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u/bruinsfannumber6 Jun 14 '21

Since when was southeastern crimea so mountainy

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u/martyfrancis86 Jun 15 '21

God I love these maps!

2

u/europainviktus Jun 15 '21

I dunno man. Seems like a country to me where USA would bring democracy.

4

u/sreaht Jun 15 '21

My friend, we have been living in a very democratic way in Turkey for 100 years. There is neither sharia nor dictatorship. Please mind your own business.

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u/IRL_Cordoba Jun 14 '21

Apologies if I'm asking a stupid question but how do Turkey and Iran have such high populations despite being so hilly and inhospitable at a topographical glance? I know a lot of Turkey's population is distributed along Thrace and the Aegean.

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u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

Thanks for asking. Turkey's high population is due to intensive agriculture for years. The population is high in the regions where agriculture and animal husbandry are made, because the high population means more labor force. Contrary to what it appears on the map, we are not actually such a mountainous country. Even plateaus look like mountains since the main purpose of the map is to show elevations. Adana Çukurova, Konya plain and Bafra plain are just three of the numerous plains in Turkey.

Many people in the regions outside the plains migrated to the cities to work in the service sector and industry, since there was no job opportunity in their villages. This situation increased squatting and uncontrolled settlement. The result was a population jump.

Today, more than half of Turkey's population lives in big cities.

I hope I was able to answer your question <3

27

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

And I don't understand why all my comments about turkey getting downvoted. Guys, I'm Turkish. I think I can explain my country enough.

7

u/IRL_Cordoba Jun 14 '21

Thanks for your detailed responsible and sorry to hear about the inexplicable downvoting. I know Istanbul is the second largest European city behind Moscow depending on what metric you use, would Istanbul and ankara seen the biggest increase or are there other urban areas that have seen sharp growth?

7

u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

Istanbul and Ankara received the most immigration. Istanbul received immigration from the Black Sea region. Ankara received immigration from eastern and southeastern Anatolia. Other regions continued to increase in population, but metropolitan cities rose more sharply with migration.

4

u/MaslakMafia Jun 14 '21

Istanbul is larger than Moscow btw. Istanbul is the largest city on Europe. The European part of Istanbul is slightly smaller than Moscow, and same size as London.

5

u/Sipas Jun 14 '21

It's not like the Himalayas. The whole country is elevated so we have lots of plains at high elevation (plus highlands) and the country is big enough that it's just fine.

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u/TheMartianEmperor Jun 14 '21

Iran has lots of valleys and small rivers which are pretty easy to defend (If you have competent leaders and armies that is) and where agriculture can be practiced. The North of Iran around the Caspian e.g. Gilan, Mazandaran are pretty flat green regions shielded by the Alborz with lots of forests and farms, and the Southwest e.g. Khuzestan is also relatively flat alluvial land near the Iraqi plain.

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u/chapeauetrange Jun 14 '21

Both countries experienced population booms during the 20th century. In 1927, the population of Turkey was 13.5 million.

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u/Str8OutOfSumadija Jun 14 '21

When i was in Turkey as a kid on vacation i understood why did they invade the Balkans.The nature there did not look that good for agriculture or like rain was a sure thing over the years.Mountains everywhere and the only real thing that is developed are the regions on the sea.

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u/gkayaalp Jun 14 '21

i mean yes and no, far east is pretty hilly but most of asia minor is nice arable land actually, and there's a decent amount of water and green apart from that. it is mountainous but we have a lot of plateaus, plus the mountainous land is good for farming animals.

as for balkans i guess they were after the rakia :P

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u/hmmokby Jun 14 '21

Eastern part is really cold in winter and also Northern part is rainny too much. Problem is about agriculture lands. Farming was hard with old style agriculture technology.

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u/TinkyWinky2008 Jun 14 '21

Eastern Anatolia was invaded later than Balkans

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u/-4-a- Jun 14 '21

You should also keep in mind that Turkish Beyliks who invaded the Balkans were pastoralists, they had no issue living in mountainous grasslands and you could even see them prefer it over farmland. They wanted places to graze their animals.

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u/Gonderilmis1 Jun 14 '21 edited Jun 14 '21

You are wrong because Ottomans occupated Balkan before Anatolia.

Yeah i know Ottomans came from South Marmara region and before the passing to Balkan that they have got land at West Anatolia land but this land (Bursa, İzmit, Konya etc.) still most developed cities of Republic of Turkey.

A Balkan Turkish reported :)

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u/[deleted] Jun 14 '21 edited 23d ago

[deleted]

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u/QuodCassius Jun 14 '21

Anatolia is quite suited for agriculture actually

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u/a4bh3 Jun 14 '21

This reminds me that I think Turkey should exercise more power in the Middle East, the Caucuses, and even the Balkans. Things were better in those places with Turkish governance.

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u/MontagoDK Jun 14 '21

The resolution seems a bit low ? Could you post pictures like this in bigger res ?

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u/kryptonite84 Jun 14 '21

So how come the turkish food has so many veggies(tomatoe, peppers, aubergines) added? If they have just a small amount of plaines?

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u/sreaht Jun 14 '21

I don't know if it's the shading style of the map or something else, but we're not actually such a brutally mountainous country. Vegetables are produced on the Aegean coasts. In the Mediterranean, there are farmers who even produce tropical fruit. So when you come to Turkey, you can eat local mango, banana and papaya there. In eastern Anatolia, where the mountains are frequent and partly brutal, animal husbandry is done rather than agriculture.

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u/TheSlapDash Jun 14 '21

Would you like some mountains with your invasion?

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u/arkenteron Jun 14 '21

Topography of Turkey, Cyprus, Syria, Lebanon. From memory I am not sure about Georgia. Most of Israel, Jordan and Iraq and Armenia.

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u/WanderLustKing69 Jun 14 '21

If you’re so clever why didn’t you mention Ukraine, Bulgaria, Romania and Moldova?

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u/Sgt-Sucuk Jun 14 '21

Where is grease?🤬

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u/WanderLustKing69 Jun 14 '21 edited Jun 14 '21

On the pole

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u/byarstheemperor Jun 14 '21

Topography of Ottoman empire in 16th Century*

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u/arkenteron Jun 14 '21

Nope maybe, topography of the Asian part of the Ottoman empire in the early 16th Century.

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u/Starkregen Jun 14 '21

But we are agreed on this being topography right

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u/tugboattt Jun 14 '21

Genuinely thought that this was made of turkey and it was a joke for a minute

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u/SteamyExecutioner Jun 14 '21

So a land invasion is out of the question then

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u/SaintPanda_ Jun 14 '21

Did you make this? Of so; do norway next

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u/berk---- Jun 14 '21

Taşı toprağı altın sanıyordum, dağ ulan bu bildiğin

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u/FrenchHouseFan Jun 14 '21

NUMBER ONE COUNTRY🇹🇷🇹🇷
DEATH TO THE GYPSIES AND THE GREEKS

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u/KaiserWSIS Jun 14 '21

Ah, my favorite city in Turkey, Damasscus. Def topography of Turkey .d