r/MapPorn Jun 15 '21

GDP Per Capita

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41 Upvotes

6

u/Lloyd_lyle Jun 15 '21

North Dakota shocks me. Just as much GDP as New York or California or Massachusetts, yet in the Midwest.

7

u/sunfish289 Jun 15 '21

Thank you, petroleum: North Dakota and Alaska

1

u/RayAnselmo Jun 16 '21

Exactly. North Dakota's is fracking money.

3

u/Jose_Lebron67 Jun 15 '21

Remember that we are taking in the GDP Per Capita of the states as a whole. So we are taking the GDP Per Capita of New York entirely, and the state as a whole has some high earning areas and some low earning areas. It's an average of the entire State. All though I have to admit that the figures are pretty high for North Dakota.

7

u/wrinklyweenus Jun 15 '21

ND has oil.

4

u/Lloyd_lyle Jun 15 '21

ND also has a fairly low population, 770,026 to be precise.

8

u/beavertwp Jun 15 '21

GDP and income aren’t the same.

1

u/Sodi920 Jun 15 '21

No, but they correlate pretty well.

1

u/kaufe Jun 16 '21

GDP per capita and happiness also correlate pretty well.

8

u/marfatardo Jun 15 '21

Over $100,000.00 isn't even a state.....WTF?!!!

8

u/Any_Patient_3415 Jun 15 '21

DC

9

u/marfatardo Jun 15 '21

Yeah, I wonder how that is.....

8

u/Lloyd_lyle Jun 15 '21

Because you have to be more rich to live in a big city, since DC is nothing but the center of the larger DC city area, it just has to have a high GDP per capita.

If NYC split and became a state, the rest of NY would have a lower GDP and NYC would have a higher GDP.

7

u/Jose_Lebron67 Jun 15 '21

Yeah I actually searched it up right now, and Manhattan has similar figures to DC. Since the District of Columbia is just the city of Washington DC, incomes will appear higher because it's just that. A city. Typically incomes in large metropolitan areas will be this high

1

u/Lloyd_lyle Jun 20 '21

Did you check that it’s Manhattan, New York, and not Manhattan, Kansas?

3

u/popsmoke05 Jun 15 '21

Yea I had a friend who lived in DC he was paying 2700 a month for a little condo/apartment

He moved to Houston and now he has a big huge 2 story home in the suburbs for less money lol

3

u/Jose_Lebron67 Jun 15 '21

I was actually pretty surprised when I found that out. From a logical perspective it doesn't make sense. Especially when taking into account the fact that DC's GDP Per Capita is 3x that of the National Average, but the cost of living in DC is only 152.1% over the National Average.

5

u/Any_Patient_3415 Jun 15 '21

Because it is the most wretched hive of scum and villainy. Corruption is the law of the land there.

11

u/wrinklyweenus Jun 15 '21

And because the federal government hires armies of engineers, software designers, attorneys, and PhD level researchers.

1

u/Any_Patient_3415 Jun 15 '21

Any overpays them using our tax dollars. But yes that’s true.

4

u/I_Tichy Jun 15 '21

If by overpay you mean less than what the private sector does, then, yeah, sure.

0

u/Any_Patient_3415 Jun 15 '21

https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/reports/52637-federalprivatepay.pdf

Actually they’re on average paid significantly more if you include benefits, which is typically the allure of government jobs.

4

u/wrinklyweenus Jun 15 '21

The work of the federal government is overwhelmingly performed by contractors. There is more money to be made as a contractor, but better benefits and stability as a fed. This is neither her nor there. I work for an IT company contracted to the federal government. Probably 25% of our staff has a PhD. My wife plays in a drumming group with two MIT PhDs, and a half dozen other PhDs and JDs.

1

u/Any_Patient_3415 Jun 15 '21

Good on your wife. Glad to know there’s at least some competency around there.

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4

u/Roberto-Del-Camino Jun 15 '21

I assure you that engineers, software designers, attorneys, and PhD level researchers receive generous benefits in the private sector too.

The moral of the story is quit being jealous of people who are smarter than you getting paid more because they have better jobs. Unless you think that everyone should be paid the same regardless of their job or skills. Commie!

1

u/I_Tichy Jun 15 '21 edited Jun 15 '21

Ah, my bad, I should have been specific. I was speaking directly to the comment I was responding to which was about professional degrees and PhDs (for which the report you linked supports my assertion). People at that level (including my immediate superior) leave our agency for the private sector all the time to get paid.

At lower education levels there's not much the federal government can do about it since their workforce is largely unionized, unlike in the private sector.

It's probably also worth noting how federal and private sector salaries are affected by location. Federal jobs are to a large degree concentrated in one of the most expensive places to live in the country, while private sector gigs aren't (short of tech and finance).

1

u/Roberto-Del-Camino Jun 15 '21

I assure you that engineers, software designers, attorneys, and PhD level researchers receive generous benefits in the private sector too.

The moral of the story is quit being jealous of people who are smarter than you getting paid more because they have better jobs. Unless you think that everyone should be paid the same regardless of their job or skills. Commie!

1

u/Any_Patient_3415 Jun 15 '21

I was not expressing jealousy, just frugality. If any business had debt over 8.2x that of their revenue I’m sure they would be cutting wages and benefits too, if not bankrupt.

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1

u/Roberto-Del-Camino Jun 15 '21

I assure you that engineers, software designers, attorneys, and PhD level researchers receive generous benefits in the private sector too.

The moral of the story is quit being jealous of people who are smarter than you getting paid more because they have better jobs. Unless you think that everyone should be paid the same regardless of their job or skills. Commie

0

u/RedmondBob Jun 15 '21

Or pays them a fair wage, I guess it depends on how you look at it

1

u/Jose_Lebron67 Jun 15 '21

Also because of that lol

3

u/Jose_Lebron67 Jun 15 '21

The District of Columbia. Look it up if you don't believe me

2

u/SjFcp Jun 15 '21

This is interesting in terms of economic contribution of each state, but if you want to get an understanding of how well salaried individual residents are, a median household income map likely makes more sense

For example DC generates a lot of income, but a lot of that gets paid out to MD and VA residents in the suburbs, same with NY vs NJ/CT. Similarly oil money in ND or tech money in CA (to a lesser extent) is likely concentrated and doesn’t result in as much income for average residents

-1

u/Jose_Lebron67 Jun 15 '21

Let's get this post to the hot section

1

u/gidutch Jun 15 '21

Missouri

Pronounce Misery

1

u/sunfish289 Jun 15 '21

I'm surprised Arkansas is that low. I thought there was a lot of economic activity in the northwest part of the state, with Wal-Mart, Tyson Foods, etc. And you'd think Little Rock would be a pretty significant economic hub.

Maybe Arkansas is low because it doesn't have the same level of oil/chemicals of neighboring states such as TX, OK and LA, nor the major agriculture of other nearby states??

3

u/beavertwp Jun 15 '21

Arkansas doesn’t have and big metros to carry the rural areas.

1

u/Impressive-Error-584 Jun 15 '21

WTF is going on in North Dakota?

5

u/Sodi920 Jun 15 '21

Lots of oil and very few people.

1

u/RayAnselmo Jun 16 '21

Fracking industry is ridiculous huge there.

1

u/CurtisLeow Jun 15 '21

The biggest drop-offs across state lines are:

California -> Arizona

North Dakota -> Montana

Texas -> Arkansas

New York & Massachusetts -> Vermont

1

u/Aijol10 Jun 16 '21

North Carolina is lower than I thought. They have the Research Triangle and the Charlotte Metro area, all with relatively high paying jobs.

Conversely, Louisiana is higher than I thought. What is going on there?

2

u/RayAnselmo Jun 16 '21

NC has a lot of rural area. Louisiana has the oil industry (which is also why Alaska and North Dakota skew high).