r/malaysia Dec 25 '18

Maori Soldiers visit British Malaya and and find many linguistic and cultural similarities with the Malays

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144 Upvotes

64

u/taufik_r nahu Dec 25 '18

Malays skipped leg day.

7

u/zairudin Dec 25 '18

Hahahaha. We did, didn’t we?

39

u/LeafSamurai World Citizen Dec 25 '18

You mean the Malay language is similar to the Maori language? I took 1st and 2nd year Maori language courses in uni and they are similar to the Malay language and it was very easy to learn as I already understand Malay.

43

u/petitemortx1 Dec 25 '18

Malays and Maoris share the same ancestors. That’s the theory.

16

u/LeafSamurai World Citizen Dec 25 '18

Ah okay. I think that they do, if you compare them, but obviously the Maoris are much bigger in size, and the Malays are more wiry.

9

u/Simple_Peasant_1 PSM Shill Dec 25 '18

It's probably because Maori is in the same language branch of Malay

11

u/LeafSamurai World Citizen Dec 25 '18

Yes, I am aware of that. Did the language course in my 1st year as I wanted to apply for clinical psych in NZ, and knowing the Maori language and culture would be a huge advantage, but as I learnt it, I realise that it was quite interesting and there are lots of words similar to Malay so was not too bad to learn.

2

u/Simple_Peasant_1 PSM Shill Dec 25 '18

Humour me. Like what kinds of words?

1

u/LeafSamurai World Citizen Dec 25 '18

Some of it is in the picture in this thread lol. There are others but can't think of them off my head.

3

u/surle Dec 25 '18

The number two (BM = "dua") is "rua" in Maori - plus the 'r' sound is pronounced with a slight flick of the tongue so that brings it even closer I think.

1

u/Alcoholicbananadrink Dec 26 '18

Just a wild guess, but were you by any chance in Health Sci?

2

u/LeafSamurai World Citizen Dec 27 '18

Nope. I did not do any Health Sci courses. Was in Psyc the entire time I was in Uni. I was in Canterbury if that helps :)

-3

u/konigsjagdpanther 懶覺拉麵 Dec 25 '18

That doesn’t mean anything, Dutch and English are way closer but that does not mean we could understand Dutch.

Heck even Dutch and Afrikaans speakers don’t really understand each other

1

u/redditisfuckingscary Dec 26 '18

yeah no, as a native dutch speaker its super easy to pick up english due to the similarities in spelling and prounounciation. likewise dutch is considered one of the easiest languages to pick up if you are a native english speaker. Its very much possible to pick up parts of the dutch language as an english speaker by just listening to it. i'm pretty sure with a bit of thinking you understand the words "appel, peer, eet, koolsla, vis, boot, krediet, tempel, hond, kat"

Also its super easy to understand afrikaans as a dutch speaker.

1

u/lelarentaka Pahang Dec 26 '18

It means what it means.

0

u/konigsjagdpanther 懶覺拉麵 Dec 26 '18

Very helpful

26

u/petitemortx1 Dec 25 '18

“For a Maori, Malaya is a novel experience. For the first time, we were the same colour as everyone around us and it was the pakeha chaps who were in the minority. We found that we could often pass ourselves off as Malays, with very much cheaper shopping as a result! Generally Maoris and Malays are the same colour but whilst the latter are beautifully built and muscled, they are slim in the hip and waist and lack the beef and short legged stockiness of the Maori.

The native Malay is a delightful person and thoroughly Maori in his virtues and not so different in his vices. He is warm and hospitable and will give you anything. Often he tends to live for the present and forgets about the future, and often he would rather sing than work.

For a start it was embarrassing for people to come up and start talking Malay to us, but after a while many of us picked it up and found it very similar to our own tongue. The grammar was similar, with no verb ‘to be’. Descriptive words come after the noun instead of before. Pronunciation is almost identical and we were thrilled to find that many of our words were similar to theirs. For example ‘pai’ is ‘bai’ (spelled baik) in Malay, ‘ika’ is ‘ikan’, ‘rima’ is ‘lima’, ‘tangi’ is ‘tangis’, ‘mata’ is ‘mato’ and so on.”

Source: here

22

u/nusadankejora V.M Varga (World Citizen) Dec 25 '18

The last king of Hawaii once visit Johore and told Sultan of Johore that Polynesian and Malays are long lost Malay brothers.

“This expression would later be part of the Pan-Malaysian movement led by such imminent scholars as Dr. José Rizal, Philippine Representative Wenceslao Vinzons, and President Diosdado Macapagal (father of the current president of the Philippines). The idea of "long lost brothers" of a great Pan-Pacific Malay maritime civilization stretching from Malaysia to Hawaiʻi would become a major theme in the national liberation struggles of Southeast Asia until today.”

-10

u/petitemortx1 Dec 25 '18

Literally, Hidup UMNO. Lol

30

u/krossfire42 Dec 25 '18

Austronesians unite!

13

u/GastroesophagealBow crazy poor asians Dec 25 '18

Yes, more reasons to belt out that Moana song during karaoke sessions

16

u/krossfire42 Dec 26 '18

Moana is secretly a Malay princess.

4

u/aeritheon Dec 27 '18

The Puteri Umoana

11

u/blahhh87 Dec 25 '18

Interesting read. Thanks for the link, op.

13

u/ThePangolins Dec 25 '18

Maori is the same language group/family (Malayo-polynesian) as the Malay language which explains the families. This language group stretches from Easter Island to Madagascar, including Hawaii. There are a bunch of words which are universal in languages in the group, such as ika and lima as mentioned in the article.

10

u/yonmaruni Dec 25 '18

BBut didn't Malay come from Indonesia??

30

u/Simple_Peasant_1 PSM Shill Dec 25 '18

Well, FYI, the Malay's ancestors, the Austronesians spread all over the Pacific including New Zealand so that's probably why they are similar.

15

u/banduan Kuala Lumpur Dec 25 '18

methinks there was sarcasm there... hence bbut

9

u/Simple_Peasant_1 PSM Shill Dec 25 '18

That's actually another theory that has been bandied about. The "Greater Nusantara" theory so I thought it was genuine surprise

1

u/intergalacticspy Dec 25 '18 edited Dec 25 '18

They all originate in Taiwan (or possibly Southern China). The biggest variety in the language group is in Taiwan (edit: among the Taiwanese aboriginals).

7

u/banduan Kuala Lumpur Dec 26 '18

A lot of the supporters of the throry of the Taiwan migration for Malay origins fail to recognise that Malays also have substantial Negrito, Austroasiatic and even South Asian genes. While a lot of these genes came from elsewhere, the amalgam that they constitute were mixed in the Straits melting pot and is unique to it.

1

u/petitemortx1 Dec 25 '18

Yes but they’re racially distinct from the Han Chinese even though it’s still China 🇨🇳 .

3

u/Dionysoes SapNgayot Dec 26 '18

Yes he's talking about the taiwanese aborigines

4

u/luxollidd Deus Vult! Dec 25 '18

only in malaysia the word malay is exclusive to one and only race

in larger context, the malays comprises of the malaysian malays, indonesians, pinoys, at to certain extent the chams

7

u/lelarentaka Pahang Dec 26 '18

Malay originally meant just Malay. It's just that the Europeans couldn't tell the difference between brown peoples, so they call everybody in South East Asia Malay. So you got your logic backward. It's a bit like how faranji came to mean all white people, even though it originally refers to the Franks (French people)

7

u/banduan Kuala Lumpur Dec 26 '18

You got that backwards.

In Malaysia and especially Singapore you're considered Malay just for culturally being Malay regardless of your actual race.

In Indonesia Malays are a minority. No Javanese will call themselves Malay. Or even Acehnese for that matter. Nor will Indonesian Malays recognise these ethnicities as being Malay. They all speak Malay because it's the national language (leading Malay to have more 2nd language speakers than mother tongue speakers).

In the Philippines the idea of being Malay is part of this notion of the Pan-Malay identity mooted by Jose Rizal. However, Pinoys themselves don't speak Malay, wear Malay clothing and practice Malay customs. The various Malay-related groups are a lot closer to Sabahans than to Peninsular Malays.

2

u/3KR4M Dec 26 '18

Just another brick in the wall..

Malay Origin

https://youtu.be/9GH1_h0AZD4

https://youtu.be/Qe-Fg1nL6Ng

1

u/fanfanye Dec 27 '18

Malays would rather sing than work

Probably why our colonizers called us lazy

We're not that good as slaves

1

u/[deleted] Dec 27 '18

Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.