r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL that in 1986 an astronomer trying to trace a 75 cent computer time discrepancy for 10 months eventually found a German hacker selling defense secrets to the KGB

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25k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 10h ago

TIL that In 1889 a lion escaped from a travelling show in Birmingham and ran into the sewers. When an angry mob formed, Frank Bostock, the owner secretly snuck another lion out the back. He then returned with the lion clearly visible and was hailed a hero. The escaped lion was still in the sewers!

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5k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 7h ago

TIL, that a decapitated flatworm can regrow not only its head back entirely but also all of its old memories back with it.

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1k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 4h ago

TIL of Aeroplankton, the atmospheric analogue to oceanic plankton that deposit many millions of airborne viruses and bacteria every day on every square meter around the planet.

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532 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 19h ago

TIL the Statue of Liberty almost wasn't built in New York because the governor wouldn't use city funds to build its pedestal, but Joseph Pulitzer's newspaper articles inspired 160,000 people to donate. Though a majority of donations were less than $1, they raised over $100,000 in just five months.

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8k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 11h ago

TIL that alongside FDR's "New Deal" the United States Government also pursued an "Indian New Deal". The goal was to reverse the traditional goal of cultural assimilation of Native Americans into American society and to strengthen, encourage and perpetuate the tribes and their historic cultures

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1k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 14h ago

TIL that the white rind of a watermelon, between the pink flesh and green skin, is loaded with nutrients and just as healthy as the commonly eaten pink flesh.

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1k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 23h ago

TIL In the 1936 Olympics two Japanese pole vaulters (Shuhei Nashida & Sueo Oe) tied for second. Declined to compete against each other, Nashida was awarded silver and Oe bronze. On return to Japan they had the medals cut in two & joined together to make two 'friendship medals' out of silver & bronze

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58k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL President William Henry Harrison used to do his own grocery shopping at the local market, and was known to invite people he met there to have breakfast with him at the White House. The practice stopped when people seeking jobs in the new administration began harassing him.

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161 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 19h ago

TIL that before Terry Crews was a football player or actor, he was a courtroom sketch artist. He covered the worst murder case in Flint, MI history.

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3k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL Ireland used to have crown jewels but they were stolen in 1907 and nobody has ever found them

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112 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1h ago

TIL that K2 has no local name: the British Great Trigonometrical Survey of India tried to use local names for mountains where possible, but discovered that K2 was so isolated that no one had a name for it

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Upvotes

r/todayilearned 3h ago

TIL that the first recorded genocide in history occured in Mesopotamia against the Yai’ilanum tribe. "Give an order that the sons (of the tribe) of Ya'ilanum, all those who are with you, must die tonight ... They must die and be buried in the graves!"

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123 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 9h ago

TIL about the Windover, Florida (USA) bog bodies- ancient mummies that radio carbon dating suggests they are between 7 thousand to 8 thousand years old.

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341 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL that it is believed that writing was invented independently in at least 4 different civilizations (Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Southern Mexico and Guatemala) in the span of 3000 years

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73 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 13h ago

TIL of Beirut's Grudge House. After disputes with his brother over land inherited from their father, a man built a thin, three-storey building just to hide his brother's view of the sea.

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552 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 31m ago

TIL that the NFL made a committee to spread misinformation and coverup brain damage in their players

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Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1d ago

TIL that in 2016, Live Nation admitted that less than 1/3 of tickets for a popular tour were available to fans | When The Tragically Hip announced their final tour, 2/3 of tickets were sold to brokers and more were held for industry guests.

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5k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL about William Adams, a shipwrecked 17th century English captain who, while initially imprisoned, was promoted to Samurai and gifted a fief in Japan. He remained advisor to the Japanese emperor until his death 20 years later.

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71 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 2h ago

TIL In 1855, Queen Victoria pronounced ex-U.S. President Millard Fillmore to be the most handsome man she had ever seen.

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60 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 4h ago

TIL about the Kappa, a creature from Japanese mythology. They are often accused of assaulting humans in water and removing a mythical organ called the shirikodama from their victim's anus.

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71 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 23h ago

TIL that legendary jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald forgot the words to “Mac the Knife” when performing it live in Berlin and completely improvised the lyrics. She won a Grammy for the performance.

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2k Upvotes

r/todayilearned 4h ago

TIL of the Lake Bonneville flood: 15,000 years ago Lake Bonneville, a huge lake roughly where the Great Salt Lake is today, released 380 cubic miles of water north, substantially changing the landscape around the Snake River.

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63 Upvotes

r/todayilearned 1h ago

TIL that a small town in Michigan organizes betting each and every year on when a car will fall through lake ice. It's done for charity.

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Upvotes